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francisco. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something called a baseball game out there, but these wonderful events that we have in the city whether it's america's cup whether it's fleet week, whether it's the 49ers playing or the giants playing, even eventually when we land the superbowl it all board of truste
francisco has the greatest and most vibrant nightlife of any major city in the country. i want to thank my colleague scott wiener for helping to showcase the importance of the other nine to five economy. the impact of all that you do has an impact on our job situation and local economy, and to highlight all of the great work that we can do together to ensure that the sectors that you all represent, the sectors that you work for, that you employ people for connaught is one of the greatest sectors in san francisco. i hope we will take the opportunity of the america's cup to showcase our clubs, our restaurants, our nightlife events. as someone who represents the broadaway neighborhood, an area of town that i used to spend a lot of time in when i was in my 20's -- but actually, very few locals take the time to head to the beach on broadway. our neighborhoods are coming together to say that broadway is open to the rest of the world as well as san francisco. i want to put san francisco back on the map when it comes to music. to make sure that we have the type of entertainment that we used to be
of the acknowledgments on the on set and grateful to our mayor and our city officials who are here, chief wendy steel, and those from juvenile probation, commanders and briefs and we appreciate each of the city leaders being with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the church works with the rainbow coalition. >> good afternoon. what a pleasure it is to be here and the patron saint of this great city work in the words of a prayer. lord, make me an instrument of your peace. as we look the things we realize the up tick of vlz is real and as we unified from all denominations and practices and speak simply. peace on earth and may this season be about peace. i commend mayor lee and work with him and resource ourselves and connect ourselves those in the city that believe our city can be a city of peace. as part of the rainbow coalition it's an honor to hold this today and jesse jackson and against violence prevention and that we can represent that well in the season of peace and we bring forward carolyn scott for our opening prayer of this peace hour. >> thank you reverend b
to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed
to the bring the city policy to the board of interferes in early 2013 and so as brad said i'll go over the policy and then brad will go over three major projects that we are proposing the use of i f d for. and so the port commission is very well aware in 1969, we got our 54 piers nine react activated and we have an extraordinarily large deferred maintenance problem in the magnitude of $2.2 million and what the port earned as an enterprise is not enough to deal with the assets and the defined problems and so one of our major strategies that the port has initiated in the last decade is to find other source and is so we can be successful leveraging the important assets for the future and so this chart really shows all of the growth of all of these other source that are helping ut to solve our problems and the joe bonds that we just spoke of have been important for park improvementings and i s d which, is in the bright blue is a major proposal to help us build critical flay structure for areas that otherwise, we could not afford. and as a commission m o there is an exhibit a in here in y
city. we don't lose our work force. we don't lose the people that make san francisco so special. we keep everybody here and that allow us to recover our economy, and everything because it's so interdependent. >> so that is a difficult goal but i think we can achieve it over the long time so thank you very much for hosting us and hosting this great exhibit, and thank you very much for joining >> good afternoon everyone and welcome to the november 30, 2012 -- i'm sorry december 7, 2012 meeting of the local agency formation commission. my name is david campos and i am the chair of the commission. we are joined by the clerk linda wong and i want to thank the san francisco gtv staff for the coverage of this meeting. madam clerk, if you can please call item number two, roll call. >> supervisor avalos, absent. supervisor olague. >> here. >> supervisor -- i'm sorry, commissioner schmeltzer. >> here. >> commissioner mar. >> commissioner pimentel absent. chairperson campos. >> present. >> mr. chair, there is a quorum. item two approval from the minutes from the regular meeting and november
.m. at city hall, we will be celebrating with all of our schools and school communities, teachers, parents, principals, the fact that sfusd is one of only two large urban school systems in the state of california to have surpassed the 800 api mark. [ applause ] so we're tremendously proud of our students and teachers and communities and principals. so we're going to get together and celebrate. and we're going to celebrate that, but we're also going to recognize schools that are on the move, schools that are closing the achievement gap for african-american and latino students and those with growth. so there will be lots of celebrating going on and we're going to recommitment to closing the achievement gap. because, as much as we're going to celebrate, we're also going to be very clear about the fact that we have a long way to go, but that we have the right people on the bus and the bus is heading in the right direction and we're going to add some gas to the bus on thursday. so we want to invite everybody to come and join us. >> can i just one thing? i just want to recognize the district
because it's not just a matter can be solved with an enlightened church. the killing in kansas city, a football player, his wife and himself. three or 4 nfl players say they carry a gun and with basketball players the same. somewhere we're sitting around watching san francisco play miami excited who will win that game. of the tens of thousands that watch those games those role models on the field are not ministers. those athletes have a role to play in diffusing this crisis in our culture. those that do music and art and attract by the thousands. we pay to hear them sing and watch them perform. they must lift their art above deck dance and inspire and something blowing in the wind and can't recycle our worse fears. our nation has become much too violent. we're the most violent nation on earth. we make of the most guns and we shoot them. we make the most bombs and we drop them. in this state unions larger than the teacher union and building first class jails and second class schools and [inaudible] stop the problem. each out and convene the family is the first step in the
, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet.
and the local organization our city. first a technical point on all of this. i was under the impression and check with dhr on this that the executive position still exists but filled on an interim basis. maybe i am wrong on that but good to make sure you're correct on that from the staff's perspective. i agree bringing it back in house because the next year is going to be really big for clean power sf and some other things and we need somebody that can be available five days a week, 50 weeks a year. i mean that's really going to be important, but the main thing i want to focus on is that the advocates for clean power sf have had some concerns with the way that lafco -- when we originally set set up lafco to work on clean power sf and especially get at the beginning of 2007 and what we needed from lafco and i believe the intention we needed somebody on task for clean power sf itself that could approach the sf puc on many occasions the sf puc wasn't thinking outside of the box on this to put it politely, and we need someone, and i think we will need someone well versed in local distribu
this city with this free thinking attitude is capable of providing leadership to the whole world, but there needs to be all sides involved and this city does that and i thank you supervisor olague for your leadership. >> thank you. next speaker please. >> i would like to thank supervisor olague for her leadership as well and call on the hearing on education and as well as housing. those are two issues that affect african-american community across the country as well as san francisco. i'm -- you know what i do for a living. i'm a homeless advocate. i advocate for homeless people and clifford hoosier has been coming to my center for two years now and a immigrant from sierra leon. if he returns to his home he will be killed. he is requesting asylum here in san francisco. he hasn't gotten s he is not here illegal. he's a harvard graduate as well. next year january 31 and i just been coming to city hall to try to get support for him as well, and that's pretty much all i have to sai. i would like him to speak for himself. >> i want to thank the commission for its work. this i
is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 milln gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we're thinking about building a building. that building is going to hold our operations center and our emergency operations center for things like earth quack. that building had to be immediately occupiable. great. but we can do better than that. so, this new technology that we ended up using was a concrete building that straps basically, that goes through the interior of the building and allow the building to turn or twist as part of an earthquake as it corrects itself. >> in the course for the puc building
1957, we are the only city in the world that runs cable cars. these cars right here are part of national parks system. in the early 1960's, they became the first roles monument. the way city spread changed with the invention of the cable car. >> people know in san francisco, first thing they think about is, let's go >> san francisco is home to some of the most innovative companies of the 21st century. this pioneering and forward looking spirit is alive in san francisco government as well. the new headquarters of the san francisco public utilities commission at a5 25 golden gate avenue is more than just a 13-story building and office ablation. instead, city leaders, departments and project managers join forces with local architectural firms ked to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old
it with that. this is particularly appropriate to do this in san francisco and san francisco is a italian city and always has been and will be and to get things going i have seen you put in some years of service in telea eve and familiar with israel's politics you can get into san francisco's politics and i brought this and i know senator will say something as well and we want to congratulate you and all of our italian american community as we kickoff the year of italian culture in the united states and we look forward to joining hands with you to make it as successful as possible. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> all right. and please consider me one of "us". >> thank you very much. and bona tale. i asked senator leno how do you think they say happy chanukkah in italian? and he said mozel tough and i am glad to be here and i am proud to be an italian american and it's been an important part of my identity. i believe i have the soul in my heart. [applause] . so there you are. and i remember my grandfather saying when he came over on the boat he was told the streets of america were
. welcome to city hall. it's my honor and pleasure to welcome all of you here on this reflection and celebration event, and just wanted to make sure you knew that when we were talking about this with abbey shortly after milton's passing away we thought it was a great opportunity for those that knew milton, knew his personality and engaged himself with him and his family over the many years want i find it appropriate of the families -- i am thankful abbey you and the kids agreed this is appropriate for milton and for our memories. i want to express not only our heart felt appreciation for milton's work and our sadness of losing him, but there's so many things in his life to celebrate, and i know milton way back when i started working in the city, and he came forth and said "by the way -- introduced himself as the son and carolene and the senior marks and said "we have something in common" and" what's that?" and we both went to bowdoin college and we are boft west coast guys and had friends and how did we end up at bowdoin college in maine and as we shared the stories with each
rocking san francisco city hall indian way. how about a big round of applause for all our dancers? all right. [applause] all right. once again let's hear it for your singers, our dancers from everywhere here in the san francisco bay area. [applause] all right. good singing. good dancing. posting the eagle staff at this time. be shout out to larry harrison for taking care of our eagle staff. you maybe seated. calling up to the podium at this time michael lupdtin and vice president of the marketing and branding for this station. >> hi everyone. can you hear me? hello everyone. i am from kqmd and i wanted to welcome you to this eighth annual indian heritage celebration. we are honored to be honoring four heroes from the community who have tirelessly worked throughout the year to provide the kind of service that admissible media is about and engaged community and robust heritage is about. nominated by community leaders they have worked at the grass-roots level and share the highest values we all share. as a public supported media organization we are committed to this and in no
conduct business for the residents of this city like they're supposed to be. no one's paying attention to prop a, transit first. no one. so when we take that into context, this system should be really -- yeah. mr. elsbernd brung up prop g but did it affect anything? i don't know. we have to look at those numbers today because in two weeks they're talking about cutting service to your constituents in the outer neighborhoods. yet take care of the visitors that's coming to shop in union square but what about the individuals in the outer neighborhoods. service is going to be affected deeply with these cuts. so we just ask for you and we are trying to work with the agency as a partnership, what we're asking for the support of the board as well. let's really identify the serious problems of the agency, and the bureaucratic -- the misspending of all the funds that they have. can we do that. and we're willing to work with each and every one of you as -- >> president chiu: thank you. next speaker. >> like alfred hitchcock said, good evening. first i would like to thank supervisor olague, in my
. is a rower out there. and she was hit in the head by one of these darn doors in the boat house. the city is lucky she didn't filed any suit. and she was file in her complaint and the deadline had passed and couldn't have claim to medical expenses. she suffered greatly and i have seen this boat house and it's a mess. and i don't know how people survive there with the doors that don't close properly. and is the potential liability is great. i will turn the chairmanship to our vice president, i have to get on the airline, and thank you very much. >> thank you, president, torres. quickly on the lake merced item. i will ask staff, because commissioner caen is our expert on this assets. and the nature with our commission and the recreation and park's commission warrants refreshing our recollection and making transparent how we deal with real estate when we have those unique relationships. i hope we get a chance to see that policy again. and obviously we did discuss the mou but that was prior to i guess roughly $200 million bond that just passed. it's good to get back on the agenda. i have a sp
the demand? the city is growing. in south beach, there are cranes everywhere. we will need these licenses. how will we get them? >> i can repeat what i just said, but in part, that is something that we need to have pushed from the local. right now, there is a bill applying to napa. i'm sorry, marin county. it is the same sort of problem. part of the argument is -- just like i it was a kid coming in, people come in from all over the area to eat in san francisco restaurants. they come from all over the world. again, this governor is going to support everyone locally. i lot of that will have to come from you to accomplish what is right for the city. how do we do that? >> [unintelligible] >> i blame these guys for conditions. this time, i will blame fee on the mall and senator leno. -- fiona ma and senator leno. their limited by statute, but that is very difficult to have much room to maneuver. >> you said to organize local bars. i have been trying to do that for a few years now. we have our sixth annual event coming up in september. we have been trying to get toger a long time. i am not a p
general's office. we are raising three girls in the city. native san franciscan and i am happy we are brought together to shine a light on what we have done and what we need to do. >> good evening. i am julie turman and i have been on the police commission for a we're and a half and i'm a labor and employment attorney. i am excited to be here this evening to talk about the issues of domestic violence. i am grateful for the commissioner of status of women for holding the joint meeting with us and it's a pleasure to be with you and sit across my my friend. >> good evening. i am carol kingsley. i have been on the police commission for a little over two years. my day job is as an mediator of business disputes. kingsley mediation services. i always for the last 20 years have been serving on the board of the law center to prevent gun violence, a nonprofit organization aimed at sensible gun legislation to reduce gun violence and applaud the upcoming december 15 gun buy back by omega boys club so kudos to them. thank you very much commission on status of women for meeting with us
so pleased to join reverend jackson yet again in this city. we have been a city of hope for so many other cities throughout the country, but we also struggle ourselves. we have the same problems, and we've got to i think produce models that potentially have answers for everybody else, so i will continue talking about this. it is part of who i am. it's the part of me that keeps me focused on what i have to do in this city, and just because we win a world series that we have technology companies coming in that will not allow me to rest. that is not something i say makes me so happy. i am happy if every community in the city experiences the hope that others have in the city and you can't do that if you have a lot of violence so thank you very much for being here today and i invite you to continue dialoguing with us and consider this yet another beginning of this effort that we will continue on and on. thank you. [applause] >> thank you mr. mayor. let me pause here just before we bringure our next speaker and presenter to acknowledge each of the members of clergy and faith leadersh
remove every single travel lane in the city or every single parking lane in the city and say it is categorically exempt and that would be ridiculous essentially the city tried a similar argument several years ago with the overall bike plan saying it was categorically exempt and the court said no and the city lost time, and money, and was, you know, judicially criticized for doing that. may i have another minute or so? so -- >> [timer sounding.] >> so basically the two -- >> supervisor wiener: i'll let you continue since i took up some of your time, if you could continue. >> thank you. so the other thing is that there are unusual circumstances. so basically both of the exemptions claim do not apply. the minor alterations and existing facilities. but even if they might have otherwise applied there's two reasons why you can't use categorical exemption. one i just dealt with in terms of the cumulative impact of masonic plus this project. the other one is simply unusual circumstances. and if there's a reasonable possibility that the project will have significant effect on the envi
the events that you have been to in the city hall in this one rotunda or one of the offices and so many wonderful weddings and so many celebrations and so many heart rending speeches and yes, some sad occasions too. all a part of our community and our beautiful city. as you look around this room tonight, what a diverse combination we have. it makes me smile, but it probably doesn't make nebraska smile. we live in a richly diverse city and our elected officials represent it and our events here represent it and the tree lighting should represent it and indeed it does, we call it the tree of hope. and every year we get messages from all over the country and all over the world that are put on origamis and put on this very unique, unusual tree. >> there are many cities that have holiday trees, but no one has the tree of hope. it was started by an organization and now i will have the chance to introduce you to that organization's founder and executive director. who failed to put this in the proper amount of type here. no little things happen. the sound is better, i think that you can hear and
managed bridge to city streets. this is a prescription for complication. >> it became clear unless there was one catalyst organization that took it on as a challenge, it wouldn't happen and we did that and for people to advocate. and the project has a structural rating of 2 out of 100. >> you can see the rusting reinforcing in the concrete when you look at the edges now. the deck has steel reinforcing that's corroded and lost 2/3's of its strength. >> this was accelerated in 1989 when the earthquake hit and cal came in and strengthened but can't bring to standards. to fix this road will cost more than to replace. and for the last 18 years, we have been working on a design to replace the road way, but to do in a way that makes it appropriate to be in a national park and not army post. >> i would say it's one of the most ugly structure, and it's a barrier between the mar sh and presidio. and this is a place and i brought my dogs and grandchildren and had a picnic lunch and it was memorable to use them when we come here. what would it look like when the design and development is comp
of them are in the same state and it's more extraordinary that both of them are in the same city, san francisco so congratulations. [cheers and applause] so for context i just want to mention a few things and this is no news to all of you here in the room and the people standing up with me today, but today in america more than 10 million people are living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty and limited investment and opportunities for themselves and their children, and we know that one of the most important factors in determining the economic and financial success of peoples whether or not a child grows up in those high poverty neighborhoods? a. the fact that we can predict health, education outcomes of children based on the zip code, where they live is really a tragedy and it's not something that we as americans want to see as an outcome for the next generations and part of the obama's in fact and i have builds on this and the revitalization program and with choice neighborhoods including the planning grants we're announcing here in san francisco we intend to replicate that succ
significant this would be an entirely new city neighborhood with significant economic development for the city as a whole and 5,000 construction jobs and over 7,000 permanent jobs on the site and 10,000 jobs regionally with up to 2,000 new residents so erail mentioned the fiscal analysis that we would do through fiscal feasiblable report to the board of supervisors prior to environmental review and the draft fiscal feasiblability for this probability indicates a 9 million-dollar tax benefit to the city after the cost of the city services and this is after netting out the property tax increment that we would capture through the i f b and so this is really coming from gross receipts tax and sales tax and other tacks that would continue to flow to the general fund. and elane mentioned the idea of excess tax increments and after the project needs are paid there is up to one $.6 billion paid in excess taxes generated from this site. pier 70 is a bit more complicated in that it's divided into a number of districts and a master plan starting in 2,007 and the commission chose to let out pourings of t
, but he trownsed most of the city that year in voter turnout. since most of my political focus is education and children i'm not someone you should ask to run your campaign lightly. i think henny will tell you that. i will vet you intensely and get in your face, and i will question your beliefs, and i want to make sure you're serious about service in education, and it's funny as milton was he was very serious about service to his city. for some people the call to politics is great. for some it is ego or path to money or power or corruption. some people are called to politics for service, and the political arena it's hard to know a person's calling. in milton's case it was his genetic makeup. it was his everyday. it was as much a part of him as his receding hair line. his great love and commitment to making city college a fine institution for every person in our city was part of his circulatory system, and yes he was a politician, and a fine one at that, but his calling was better serve the future of san francisco to save our institutions for his children and our children
crowded neighborhood. it's shocking to me that the city would -- with a straight face, think that this was not some kind of a significant impact that would at least warrant environmental review. i'm not saying ultimately whether the project should or should not be adopted, but to think that it's entitled to some kind of a categorical exemption is a minor alteration is absolutely shocking to me as a member of the public. i am personally very concerned about these plantares in the middle of the street. if they get into intersections, and you're someone trying to walk with a cane, these plantares will be a major concern to me, as someone who has a visual issue as i walk down the street, looking for things that are abnormal, like a plantar, will really throw my path to travel off and could cause me to veer directly into traffic, given the fatals just cr yesterday on biel and market, as someone with all of their census walking into the intersection was just killed yesterday on biel and market. i'm shocked that this city would really think that this project, on fell street, and oak
: las vegas is one of the fast-growing areas in the country. it's a relatively new city under constant construction. but because it's in the arid mojave desert, the challenge of las vegas is supply. woman: all the growth and everything that's occurred in southern nevada has been with colorado river water. without it, the west as you know it today couldn't exist. narrator: to sustain their growing community with its limited supply, las vegas learned to be extremely efficient. mulroy: this is a desert, and it has its own beauty, but you have to get beyond what you're used to. as long as people recognize they're moving to the desert and give up this notion that they have to bring eastern vegetation with them and make the necessary adaptations in their own life, desert communities can continue to live. man: the biggest water user in the desert is turf. turf uses a lot of irrigation and uses spray irrigation, so what we've done here is use artificial turf. you're never going to be able to achieve the look of back east or the look of, say, california, with subtropical plants, but our landsca
, and a donation in the city hall when you have to visit, we have canisters for those who need food for this season, also if you would join us in the weekend of december 15th and 16th, we are going to have family orientation outside with snow day here in city hall. we are bringing snow in again. and we are going to enjoy this with our snow day, december 15th and 16th, you are all welcome to come and bring the kids and all of the extended families. and if i may say again, these holidays and what the tree represent is the best hope and wishes. the holidays should never be about ourselves. what reminds us and what this tree will continue doing, is that you have to remember others that are less fortunate, and share our hearts and our minds and our resources with them. and it is just like japan, for what they have done. if you read the papers recently, you know, that japan suffered a very harsh earthquake and tsunami a while back. and they could have easily said, that we are victims of a national disaster. but, when the country heard that the debris was crossing international lines, all the way to the w
, the benefit of being both a city and county, in some respects it is easier to bring all partner agencies together by choice or by hook. but i would urge us to continue to look at regional partnerships and for ways to support this beyond our boundaries. the crimes are not just within our boundaries. >> a want to make this comment before we go into public comment, more question than anything else. in the spirit of how i do business. this is the part of tonight's agenda. i'm not saying it should have been. but tonight looking at the response of domestic violence, the prosecution rates, the query reporting module, and the other things i'm curious about the status of women. at some point i would like to hear about any progress in prevention of any of these crimes. what we really want to do is go out of business. i never looked at the department as a prevention agency; some people do. they do the practice of police officers. i don't want to leave people feeling that this is inevitable. i am curious. they have conversations with folks about best practices or inroads? i am in the busi
of january, and a donation in the city hall when you have to visit, we have canisters for those who need food for this season, also if you would join us in the weekend of december 15th and 16th, we are going to have family orientation outside with snow day here in city hall. we are bringing snow in again. and we are going to enjoy this with our snow day, december 15th and 16th, you are all welcome to come and bring the kids and all of the extended families. and if i may say again, these holidays and what the tree represent is the best hope and wishes. the holidays should never be about ourselves. what reminds us and what this tree will continue doing, is that you have to remember others that are less fortunate, and share our hearts and our minds and our resources with them. and it is just like japan, for what they have done. if you read the papers recently, you know, that japan suffered a very harsh earthquake and tsunami a while back. and they could have easily said, that we are victims of a national disaster. but, when the country heard that the debris was crossing international lines, all
angel gabriel was sent from god to a city of galilee named..." >> narrator: every sunday, in every corner of the world... >> "...the virgin, betrothed to a man whose name..." >> narrator: ...people gather to hear a story. >> "...and the virgin's name was mary." >> narrator: for more than 2,000 years, that story has been told and retold. >> "...and to bear a son." >> narrator: along the way, each generation has found in its telling its own meaning and interpretation. >> "'...you shall call his name jesus...'" >> narrator: that story, of a man called jesus of nazareth, a man who became jesus christ, was originally told by his first followers... >> "'...and be called the son of the most high.'" >> narrator: ...and then retold in accounts by later believers in the gospels. >> "the gospel according to st. luke." >> narrator: so began the building of a religion. now it is our turn, with the help of scholars and historians, theologians and archaeologists, to return to that time and use our best efforts to understand that story... of a man born in obscurity in whose name a faith was made.
so we have to look at promise of our cities. san francisco bay area is a city that has great resources to meet the challenges of global climate change. this program, the cleanpower sf program is what we have. it's our greatest tool to assure we're doing our part around climate change around the world, and this little area of the world can actually make a huge difference, and that's what we have to decide how we're going to implement over the next few months, but the major work that we have actually accomplished by green lighting this program to move forward. i want to also emphasize that while we're actually implementing a program addressing our part with climate change and creating the clean power program in san francisco we're meeting a program that meets the needs of the city, not just around clean energy but employment and if we're successful in this program, and especially to the build out of the program that can happen when we have revenue coming in and many jobs can come with the build out and i am excited about that. there are neighbors in san francisco that are gr
communities in the city. supervisor olague that touched on that. and second the plan does not take into account the impacts of the roll out and pricing scenarios being developed by local power which you have contracted with to do this, and the rate fairness board wants to study these before recommending the rates which will affect what you tell people in your surveys and outreach. so we respectively ask that you direct the staff to return to you in december or january with a really detailed outreach program that clarifies the outreach strategy and integrates local build out and jobs, and infrastructure and incomes into pricing and outreach. thank you. >> hi folks. nice to see you all again. i think it's been a number of months since i addressed you briefly. of course i speak on behalf of the advocates and we have been very actively involved in this issue and we sent you this later with our considered opinion which i hope you take seriously, serious reservations that we have as advocates representing the community with this particular plan. i want to give personal feelings abo
the value of trying to reach these goals that the city has put forward which have to do with makes sure that we get to 100% renewable electricity supply within 10 years, so i think how people are informed is pretty critical. >> yes, yes. and that's largely why we're making the presentation today is to talk through what the different methods are. >> yes. >> we don't get to the level of detail of actual scripts but we do have examples of the questions we will be asking and the information we will be providing, and this bill premium chart is a good example of just the level of detail we can provide customer when is we talk with them because we will know what tier they're in and can say what your typical bill is like today and what it would like if you stay with the cleanpower sf program. >> it's deeper than the cost. some people see the value and investing in a sustainable future. >> right, and so talking about the product. >> and this is put on. look you will see the increases in your bills and then people might be inclined to opt out if they're not reminded of the value behind the clea
. these are important fixes to make some of the highest speed streets in our city closest to our most beloved park more safe for people walking. it clearly -- this project clearly falls into a categorical exemption from a full environmental review. it is clearly minor. and a reversal of the exemption would really set a bad precedent, forcing full reviews on traffic calming projects, even small scale fixes like bulbouts as well as other sustainable design improvements. a reversal would delay not only these current improvements that are much-needed as the previous speaker said on fell and oak, but critical projects in the future. we need safer streets sooner, not with more delays. so thank you very much. >> good evening, supervisors. my name is jason henderson, i'm with the hayes valley neighborhood association. the hvna enthusiastically endorsed this project and we ask that you reject this appeal. i've participated in multiple meetings on this project. there was a thorough public process. density has been mentioned. the real problem that we acknowledge in hayes valley is the density of cars is the real
our public schools despite all the range of new issues, i must respond to at city hall. just one sad thing and i wish i had a little more time to accomplish -- it's going to be on tonight's agenda as first reading. it's an opportunity for us to make a statement that we do care about people who live in the city. we do care about people who stay in the city and we do care about people, in particular, people of minority businesses and businesses run by women in the city to have opportunities to take advantage -- not take advantage, but opportunities to earn the money that us the residents in san francisco put into for our facilities bond measure. so this one sad thing and i won't be able to vote on even though i'm a co-author and hopefully people see the light in that approach of supporting, in particular, everybody in san francisco, but in particular minority and women businesses. i will stop at that. i just want to thank you for indulging me and letting me say something. and hopefully, in the future it's not like i'm going to walk away from public education. i love public educati
is in light of recent events in the city. the concern is that women who don't speak english or are living in poverty will have concerns about reaching out of the police department. we want to reassure and reach out. can you talk about your efforts to reach out to communities through various newspapers in different languages and how the department is getting the message out that we do have access to other languages and can serve diverse populations? >> anytime there is a community meeting, and it is based on a certain ethnicity group, we try to have interpretation service provided. we will post those signs in that language, so if it is held in chinatown or wherever, for that outreach. it is important when the victim makes the police report; it helps if a native speaker is there, eases some of the angst the victim may have when reporting a crime. in terms of outreaching and publications, i don't know everything that we have this is internally where we are trying to streamline and have more officers certified. >> i know you have been on the job three months, it's wonderful
this to be 18 and over. we have been 21 andover. there was ample precedents for these events in the city. it was our personal belief that if you could fight or die for the country or vote in an election, you should be able to go to a party. [applause] the folks that we were working with at the police department were hesitant about that. to address their concerns we agreed to very stringent beer gardens, which we did not feel like needed, but we did it in order to produce the event. later, we found out it would not be an 18 and older event. it essentially became a non- negotiable item. if we wanted them to sign off on the permit, with a bar, which was a major revenue stream, we had to be 21 and over. being a promoter and organizer with a long history of doing these events without problems, with a curved track record, that seemed like a perfect result. the police requirement at the event looked like two cops, with no problems with nothing to do, there were five officers at the event now, which we had to pay overtime fees for. trying to discuss this with the officers, public safety is broug
baskets with some of the kids from shalom school as well. this is one of the great examples of our city's resources really helping to make our city more lovable. >> today marks the beginning. a re-creation of community and hope. a re-creation of opportunity. we need simply this. you come, if you like this park. that you show the world when you invest in people that it matters. >> that concludes the general manager's report. although i believe commissioner lowe. >> thank you, mr. president. i want to compliment the staff and department on putting together a citizen's advisory committee for the palace of fine arts. being involved it is a very vibrant and vocal process. it encourage all to attend the public meetings on december 5th and december 12th. there's a lot of creative and great ideas coming out of the process. i encourage all to attend. >> thank you. ditto that remark. that is right. let's move on. >> public comment. i have three cards. george wooding, katherine howard and andrea oleri. >> good morning commissioners. my name is george gooding. i represent the college for san franc
're fixing your knowledge you're adding to the city wide resiliency. >> >> what does that mean? >> that's a great question. what spur has done is look at that in terms of recovery and in new orleans with katrina and lost many of the people, hasn't recovered the building stock. it's not a good situation. i think we can agree and in san we want to rebuild well and quickly after a major disaster so we have defined what that means for our life lines. how do we need the gasolines to perform and water perform after an earthquake and the building stock as well, so we have the goal of 95% of our homes to be ready for shelter in place after a major earthquake, and that way people can stay within the city. we don't lose our work force. we don't lose the people that make san francisco so special. we keep everybody here and that allow us to recover our economy, and everything because it's so interdependent. >> so that is a difficult goal but i think we can achieve it over the long time so thank you very much for hosting us and hosting this great exhibit, and thank you very much for joining >>> my
the qualification of an identifiable person for city elective office." because that presumes that that person has not yet qualified, and that the purpose of the endeavor is to have them be a qualified candidate. it's not to support the election of the that person. it's really more about getting them to be a qualified candidate and i'm actually thinking less about the draft someone over the summer or draft someone as a written that actually happened in 1999 in ammiano for mayor. i recall some of that, but try not to recall all of it this sec. you could have the same efforts that happened with "run he had run," and progress for all," in the context of a write-in campaign and i'm not sure under this definition it would get captured. that is why i'm hung up on qualification versus election. >> may i ask you a question about that? >> sure. >> it's not clear to me why that is materially different from what we have? >> well, again it's not necessarily the election of a person. that is not necessarily the goal of the committee or the committee would assert that is not their goal. it's to get them t
to be as a servant at city college. it was very difficult in his position, often being the one vote out of seven, often finding rubber stamping of a decision, fighting the way we were spending our money for ten years. ten years he was in a position most of the time alone trying to speak up and say why are we doing this? we're running the college into the ground. this shouldn't be the way things should be, and when i got into the board and i concluded the same thing and i said "milton god bless you". i couldn't have been here for ten years and put up with this stuff ." and he just laughed and smiled and thank god he had been there for the people of san francisco for city college and more importantly the students of that institutionifieding that fight when no one really cared about what was happening over there. it was very easy not to care. i think that tells you something about a man, a son of privilege, fighting quietly for a decade for children who could never imagine such privilege. i think it tells you something about a man who when he finally got into power whrks he finally had a majo
:00. th is just outside the hayward city limits. the tracks were shutdown while authorities investigated. the authorities have not released the identity of the victim. >>> two people managed to walk away from a car fire today. alan wang shot this video. he was there before the fire department arrived on scene. the accident happened just before 4:00 this afternoon. the driver lost control while exiting highway 24 at fish ranch road. the exit was closed for awhile, but is open tonight. >>> discussion about a controversial soccer field project in san rafael continues when the city council meets tomorrow night. the proposed complex at the san rafael airport is opposed by environmental groups and some residents. concerns include the impact on wildlife and airport safety issues. supporters say the city needs more athletic fields. it is supported by a 5 to 1 vote by the planning commission. >>> southwest airlines settled a lawsuit worth $29 million for denying passengers the use of drink vouchers that didn't have an expiration date. the class action suit covers 5.8 million unredeemed tickets is
in the bayview. i know the church leaders in the bayview and in the southeast sector of the city. i know that we need to close the achievement gap of the targeted population, which is the african-american, the latinos, the polynesians, and our chinese-american children, because we are having all of these problems at our school sites our chinese-american children have come to me and told me that they will not do well in the c s.a.t. and they are struggling and that should not be. thank you for allowing me this time president yee, thank you. >> thank you. advisory committee reports, appointments by board members? seeing none, item l. special order of business. i now call the public hearing and approval of the state testing apportionment waiver. is there a motion and second? >> i move. >> second. >> reading of recommendation by commissioner designee. mr. burke? >> superintendent, commissioners, my name is john burke, i'm the supervisor for the assessments office. requested action that the board of supervisors -- the board of education of the san francisco unified school district will hold a
done incredible things for pier threatening and fisherman's whof and the city and thank you for the work that you do. >> judge edwards senior property manager when i first came to the port at the same time that kevin did you took the time to take me under your winnings and create a partnering relationship and helped me three navigate some of the politics and got us off to the right direction and i'm so glad that you were there for me and so thank you and i wish you the best of luck in your score, i guess, the saim name of it and so we are looking forward to being the results of that i'm sure it will be fantastic. thank you. (applause). is there anyone else who would like too speak? >>> well like everyone else when i first join the commission bob was one of the first people i went out to lunch with and we went out to lunch at pier 39 and the he told me all about pier 39 and fisherman's whof and i'm definite going to miss him and we have this wonderful plack that does not say enough about your contribution to the water front and it says macintosh welcoming 20 years of welc
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